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The rusty-patched bumble bee (Bombus affinis) flies between flowers at the UW-Madison Arboretum in Madison, WI. Thursday, July, 6, 2017. It was officially listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act on Tuesday, March 21. (Photo by Hyunsoo Leo Kim | University Communications)

The rusty-patched bumble bee (Bombus affinis) flies between flowers at the UW-Madison Arboretum in Madison, WI. Thursday, July, 6, 2017. It was officially listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act on Tuesday, March 21. (Photo by Hyunsoo Leo Kim | University Communications)

Feature story

UW Arboretum Workshop Tracks Endangered Bees with Photos In the Media

“With a trained eye and quick finger stabbing the air, University of Wisconsin–Madison Arboretum native plant gardener Susan Carpenter counts off the bumble bees buzzing in front of her. …

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Rusty-patched bumble bee on Culver's-root

Bee alert: Bumble Bees Are Struggling, but Still Alive in the UW Arboretum In the Media

“We’ve heard a lot about how habitat loss and pesticide use is affecting honey bee and monarch butterfly populations, but wild bee populations are feeling the impact as well. In …

2015 team leader training work party. Team leader, David Smith. Team leaders in training: Marc Amante, Will Boettcher, Claire Bjork, Mike Bjork, Frankie Fuller, Kristin Haider, Jason Holman, Mark Horan, Anne Pearce, Tom Pearce, Susan Wulfsberg. Several drop-in volunteers joined the work party as well.

Restoration Team Leaders: Core Members of the Community Arboretum News

Restoration team leaders are some of the unsung heroes of the Arboretum. For the last 25 years, year-round, in all kinds of weather conditions, at different locations, and working with …

An adult wild indigo weevil, Apion rostrum, places its eggs into young seed pods where the young grow, feeding on developing seeds. Photo: Ali Lorenz

Gardening with Native Plants: Legumes in Summer Gardens Arboretum News

In July, many members of the pea or bean family (Fabaceae) bloom or are in fruit in our prairie and savanna gardens. Some species are welcome, even prized. Others we watch for …

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