Outdoor public walks are subject to cancellation due to the following weather conditions: 10 degrees Fahrenheit or less with a wind chill factor, a heat index above 100 degrees Fahrenheit, thunderstorms, or excessively snowy and icy conditions.

Masks are required indoors in UW–Madison buildings. We will update events and public health guidance as needed. See COVID-19 updates for additional information about Arboretum operations. Event capacity may be limited due to COVID-19 precautions.

  • Monday, January 17

    Visitor Center closed

    All day

    The Visitor Center will be closed Monday, January 17.

  • Sunday, January 23

    Garden Stroll
    Walk

    1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

    This gently paced stroll through the gardens is well-suited for a multi-generational outing. Learn about the land, plants, animals, fungi, phenology, and ecology. Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes and come prepared for weather and insects. Walks take place rain or shine, except in unsafe weather. Routes are wheelchair accessible when weather allows. Free, no registration required. Meet at the Visitor Center.

  • Sunday, January 30

    Nature Hike
    Walk

    1 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

    Learn about the land, plants, animals, fungi, phenology, and ecology. Geared for adults, these longer walks may cover some sloping terrain. Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes and come prepared for weather and insects. Walks take place rain or shine, except in unsafe weather. Free, no registration required. Meet at the Visitor Center.

  • Thursday, February 3

    Culture and Conservation: Black Communities Advancing Environmental Justice and Stewardship
    Winter Enrichment Lecture

    10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

    Dr. Na’Taki Osborne Jelks, assistant professor, Environmental and Health Sciences, Spelman College, and cofounder, West Atlanta Watershed Alliance. Fighting for environmental justice and mobilizing the community, WAWA has preserved over 400 acres of greenspace from development. Osborne Jelks will highlight their role in public land stewardship, work to advance water and park equity, and efforts to educate residents. Register by January 30.

  • Saturday, February 5

    Ecological Restoration Work Party
    Wingra Oak Savanna

    9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

    Volunteer for restoration activities and learn about prairies and savannas. Tools and training provided. Groups welcome with advance notice. Meet at Arbor Dr. parking lot, off Monroe St. Event capacity is limited, please arrive by 9 a.m. More information: (608) 265-5214 or marian.farrior@wisc.edu.

  • Sunday, February 6

    Nature Hike
    Walk

    1 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

    Learn about the land, plants, animals, fungi, phenology, and ecology. Geared for adults, these longer walks may cover some sloping terrain. Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes and come prepared for weather and insects. Walks take place rain or shine, except in unsafe weather. Free, no registration required. Meet at the Visitor Center.

  • Thursday, February 10

    All the Little Things
    Winter Enrichment Lecture

    10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

    Chris Helzer, Nebraska Director of Science, The Nature Conservancy. Helzer is dedicated to raising awareness about the value of prairies through photography, writing, and presentations. The complex interactions of plants and invertebrates keep prairie communities vibrant and resilient. Their stories are fascinating and will make you fall in love with them. Highlights include the beauty and diversity he found in a square meter of prairie. Register by February 6.

  • Saturday, February 12

    Ecological Restoration Work Party
    Core Area and Curtis Prairie

    9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

    Volunteer for restoration activities and learn about prairies and savannas. Tools and training provided. Groups welcome with advance notice. Meet at the Visitor Center. Event capacity is limited, please arrive by 9 a.m. More information: (608) 265-5214 or marian.farrior@wisc.edu.

  • Saturday, February 12

    Full Moon Night Walk
    Walk

    6:30 p.m. – 8 p.m.

    Naturalists lead this hike under the Hunger Moon. The name of this moon likely refers to the scarcity of food in some regions during mid-winter. We will enjoy the night sky and nature’s sounds under the waxing moon (full February 16). Free, no registration required. Meet at the Visitor Center.

  • Sunday, February 13

    "Breaking Trail" Open House

    12:30 p.m. – 4 p.m.

    Learn about outdoor recreation opportunities at an open house with Tales from Planet Earth "Breaking Trail" event partners. Join nature hikes from 1 to 2 p.m. (register for hikes: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/winter-hike-and-breaking-trail-open-house-tickets-244633263677). Meet at the Visitor Center. Presented in conjunction with the Nelson Institute's Tales from Planet Earth Film Series "Breaking Trail" film screening and discussion with Emily Ford.

  • Sunday, February 13

    "Breaking Trail" Guided Hikes

    1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

    Join guided hikes at the Arboretum and learn about outdoor recreation opportunities at an open house with Tales from Planet Earth "Breaking Trail" event partners. Hikes 1–2 p.m. (register for hikes: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/winter-hike-and-breaking-trail-open-house-tickets-24463326). Open house: 12:30–4 p.m. Meet at the Visitor Center. Presented in conjunction with the Nelson Institute's Tales from Planet Earth Film Series "Breaking Trail" film screening and discussion with Emily Ford.

  • Thursday, February 17

    Arboretum Research Symposium

    10 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

    Students will present findings from projects on Arboretum lands and in the Lake Wingra watershed. Presenters: Katherine Charton, Mary-Claire Glassenhardt, Skye Harnsberger, Nick Hoffman, Dana Johnson, and Eliza Soczka. Advance registration required.

  • Saturday, February 19

    Ecological Restoration Work Party
    Grady Tract

    9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

    Volunteer for restoration activities and learn about prairies and savannas. Tools and training provided. Groups welcome with advance notice. Meet at Grady Tract parking lot, southeast corner of Seminole Hwy. and W. Beltline Frontage Rd. Event capacity is limited, please arrive by 9 a.m. More information: (608) 265-5214 or marian.farrior@wisc.edu.

  • Sunday, February 20

    Nature Hike
    Walk

    1 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

    Learn about the land, plants, animals, fungi, phenology, and ecology. Geared for adults, these longer walks may cover some sloping terrain. Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes and come prepared for weather and insects. Walks take place rain or shine, except in unsafe weather. Free, no registration required. Meet at the Visitor Center.

  • Thursday, February 24

    Longenecker Horticultural Gardens: Connecting People, Plants, and Place
    Winter Enrichment Lecture

    10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

    David Stevens, curator, Longenecker Horticultural Gardens, UW–Madison Arboretum. Stevens will discuss the ongoing efforts to engage a wider public audience about the importance of plants through learning, art, science, culture, and remembrance. Register by February 20.

  • Saturday, February 26

    Ecological Restoration Work Party
    Core Area and Curtis Prairie

    9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

    Volunteer for restoration activities and learn about prairies and savannas. Tools and training provided. Groups welcome with advance notice. Meet at Martin Street parking lot, off Fish Hatchery Road. Event capacity is limited, please arrive by 9 a.m. More information: (608) 265-5214 or marian.farrior@wisc.edu.

  • Sunday, February 27

    Garden Stroll
    Walk

    1 p.m. – 2 p.m.

    This gently paced stroll through the gardens is well-suited for a multi-generational outing. Learn about the land, plants, animals, fungi, phenology, and ecology. Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes and come prepared for weather and insects. Walks take place rain or shine, except in unsafe weather. Routes are wheelchair accessible when weather allows. Free, no registration required. Meet at the Visitor Center.

  • Thursday, March 3

    Understanding Movement and Population Dynamics of Migratory Birds
    Winter Enrichment Lecture

    10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

    Amber Roth, assistant professor of Forest Wildlife Management, University of Maine. Understanding how birds move through the region depends on a network of observers, researchers, and decision-makers to ensure that appropriate conservation actions are taken to alleviate threats and enhance migratory habitat. Register by February 27.

  • Thursday, March 10

    Four Hundred Years of Fire and Wind in the Boundary Waters
    Winter Enrichment Lecture

    10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

    Lee Frelich, director, Center for Forest Ecology, University of Minnesota. We will explore how the fire regime has changed over the last 400 years, how it varies across the landscape, how fire and wind influence forest succession, and the future of the Boundary Waters with a warmer climate. Register by March 6.

  • Thursday, March 17

    Water Advocacy in Wisconsin: Watershed and Statewide Approaches
    Winter Enrichment Lecture

    10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

    Allison Madison, sustainability and development coordinator, Wisconsin Salt Wise, and Alli Wenman, WATER Project outreach coordinator, UW–Madison Arboretum. Wisconsin needs action at different scales to protect freshwater resources. The Arboretum’s Water Action to Encourage Responsibility (WATER) Project and the Wisconsin Salt Wise Partnership work to address water quality issues at watershed and statewide scales. Register by March 13.

  • Thursday, March 24

    The DRAWdown Design Project: Illustrating and Inspiring Climate Change Solutions
    Winter Enrichment Lecture

    10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

    Andrew Hall, founder / creative director, Drawdown Design Project. Why commission pop culture illustrators to created limited-edition screen prints inspired by climate change solutions? Our speaker shares the inspirations that went into this project and his larger thoughts on positivity and pragmatism in climate art. Register by March 20.

  • Thursday, March 31

    How High-Resolution Satellite Imagery Has Changed Ecological Research in Antarctica
    Winter Enrichment Lecture

    10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

    Michelle LaRue, associate professor, University of Canterbury. LaRue’s research focuses on understanding the biogeography and populations of marine predator species in the Southern Ocean. Her tools of choice tend to be high-resolution satellite imagery, spatial modeling, and working with citizen scientists. Register by March 27.

  • Thursday, April 7

    Anticipating the Hydrologic Consequences of Emerald Ash Borer Invasion in Tribal Forested Wetlands
    Winter Enrichment Lecture

    10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

    Angela Waupochick, PhD student, UW–Madison Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology. Tribal communities maintain significant landholdings, including black ash–dominated forested wetlands. These systems have not been a priority for management, but anticipated mortality induced by emerald ash borer has prompted tribal managers to seek strategies and prioritize areas for mitigation. Waupochick’s tribal-scale research aims to provide direction for tribal managers. Register by April 3.

  • Saturday, June 4

    Monarch Larva Monitoring Project virtual training: northern states

    10 a.m. – 3 p.m.

    Learn how to collect data that contributes to knowledge of monarch populations. Participants will learn about monarch biology, monitoring procedures, and data entry protocols, and have time to ask questions of experts. Trainings are relevant for both newcomers and active participants in monarch citizen science projects. A one-hour break is included. Select training based on geographic interest. Advance registration required.